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. one of those options from the u.n. secretary general was for him to actually send a u.n. force, u.n. blue helmeted soldiers going. what i think is interesting is he said that if he had to provide the troops, he wanted 6,000 troops on the ground. he said that if the situation on the ground was not per missive, and it you seems from everything we're seeing today it's not, he'd need 9,000, so compare the figure that he thought he needed to do the job, 9,000 to what they are going to be authorizing. some are concerned that the u.n. security council is offering a half measure here. >> compromise is being made on what is a very complex situation in an unstable african country. >> a very complex situation, one that's detearor rated since that coup earlier in the year. in many ways, i think observers believe the u.n. security council has been diverted by other crisis by what's, going on in the congress go and also what's been going on in mali. there are two seats still empty -- no, it's starting now, the security council is starting its meeting. >> we may well return to you as that meeting
of state, and former ambassador to the u.n.. dr. albright. [applause] sandy burger, former national security adviser to president clinton. sandy. [applause] leon feater, former national security adviser to vice president gore. [applause] nancy sotoburg former deputy national adviser to president clinton. [applause] and general wesley clark, former supreme allieded commander europe and director of strategic plans and policies for the joint chiefs of staff, general clark. [applause] i'd also like to recognize terry gardener, the director of the library. terry, thank you. [applause] joseph, the director of the cia information management services. [applause] skip rutherford, the dean of the public school of service. [applause] bruce lipped see, chairman of the board of the clinton foundation. [applause] former secretary of transportation rodney slater. [applause] and governor jim guy tucker. [applause] it is now my pleasure to introduce this. he was the deputy director intelligence of the cia. he was chairman of the national intelligence com and served as a assistant director of central
people have been killed. gun battles in the central african republic as the u.n. talks about reinforcing foreign troops there. >> now claims the u.s. spy agency is collecting 5 billion phone records every day to pinpoint and check people worldwide. >>> and not just a pest - how this creepy crawley is helping to design the robots of tomorrow. >> . >>> beginning the newshour. 20 are dead after an aattack in sanaa. gunmen are believed to have infiltrated the building through the eastern wing. building. the situation is now under control. there are reports of sporadic gunfire and explosions. >> we spoke to the editor in chief of the ""yemen post." >> it has not been safe in the capital. this was expected. the regime warned that they could escalate. what is behind the attack is unknown. i would not be surprised if al qaeda is not linked to the attack. or that we don't see more of al qaeda's links because it seems more unorganised than an organised attack. there are casualties between injured and killed. the government is downplaying the incident, saying that they have everything under contro
of the french over there by the end of the year. but i think what is worth bearing in mind, the u.n. secretary general when he was asked to come up with options, one of his optioning was to send a full blue elemented force, and he said that if the conditions were dangerous on the ground and it is clear from the report, it is extremely dangerous right now, he'd need 9,000 troops on the ground. now that's double what they have agreed to do with today's resolution, appoint, i put the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. have you enough troops for the job. >> we are in this resolution, walking and chews gum at the same time. we are both strengthening the mandate and working through the funding -- on the ground. but they are not yet up to full speed. we need to address that immediately, we are going to need to increase that by mid december. >> they have asked the secretary to continue planning. they say possibly that could be deployed in the future, lauren. the similar chaos that was? at the moment. >> reporting from -- it's much worse around the rest of the country. and what we unction for the moment is th
in increasingly contested skies. >>> a team of u.n. weapons inspectors arrive in iran today to tour a nuclear facility. it's the first time that a u.n. team is able to visit the site in more than two years. meanwhile, president obama has said that the pursuit of a long-standing deal with iran to monitor their nuclear weapons is as likely to fail as it is to succeed. he was speaking at a pro-israel forum in washington. iran has agreed to temporarily roll back the enrichment of uranium, which could be used to build a nuclear bomb but also to generate nuclear energy. iran calls their program peaceful. >> we have to not constantly assume that it's not possible for iran, like any country, to change over time. it may not be likely. you know, if you asked me what is the likelihood that we're able to arrive at the end state that i was just describing earlier, i wouldn't say that it's more than 50/50. we have to try. >> iran, the u.s. and five other world powers will meet in the coming days to discuss implementing a six-month agreement on iran's nuke prarm. rouhani said the deal has already benefitted
phones are being tracked based on leaks from former n.s.a. contractors, and interviews with u.s. intelligence officials. >> the report said the n.s.a. can pin down the location of a cell phone and map out relationships from them. the spy agency say it does not target the whereabouts of phones in the u.s. the n.s.a. confirmed it gathers information about americans insidently. >> a scam was discovered by trust wave. militias viruses were sent to thousands of users. it tracked credential. users of facebook, yahoo twitter could be affected. 16,000 accounts were hacked that use 123456. >> anarchy in argentina, why police refuse to put a stop no wild looting in one city. >> american doctors on the front lines of a bird flu scare half a world away. >> they've come a long way since don't ask, don't tell. coming out created new problems. >> you are looking at dallas, were there may be rain together and possibly tonight. >>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm thomas drayton. looting in argentina, why the police did not step in to stop it. >> first a look at the weathe
call role here. it is, in fact, the sanctions regime that has supported internationally through u.n. security council resolutions, u.s. actions, both in the congress and through the executive branch by the president, by the european union and other nations that has brought iran to the table. because they are looking for sanctions relief. so i understand why the congress believes that more sanctions can only be better. i agree up to a point because that's what brought them to the table. but, in fact, sanctions were meant to change the strategic calculus of iran to come to that negotiating table. now we have to test that resolve to get to an agreement. and any more sanctions at this moment by the u.s. congress would undermine the agreement which calls for a pause by everybody in that regard. and, in fact, might give them an excuse to depart from the agreement that's been made. >> ifill: but in lifting or easing those sanctions, even for six months, even for a temporary period, don't you lose some leverage. isn't that the argument members of congress are making. >> they made that argum
existing u.n. resolutions and previous violations by iran of its international obligations, that we don't recognize such a right, and if, by the way, negotiations break down, there will be no additional international recognition that's been obtained. so this deal goes away and we're back to where we were before the geneva agreement, subject -- and iran will continue to be subject to all the sanctions that we put in place in the past and we may seek additional ones. but i think what we have said is we can envision a comprehensive agreement that involves extraordinary constraints and verification mechanisms and intrusive inspections, but that permits iran to have a peaceful nuclear program. now, in terms of specifics, we know that they don't need to have an underground, fortified facility like fordor in order to have a peaceful nuclear program. they certainly don't need a heavy-water reactor at arak in order to have a peaceful nuclear program. -- iraq in order to have a peaceful nuclear program. they don't need some of the advanced centrifuges that they currently possess in order to have
.k.. bashar al-plicated assad in war crimes. you can see the piece there. the u.n. is keeping full lists of suspected war criminals. the evidence -- until the evidence is requested for an incredible -- four a credible investigation. more broadly on the situation seery, it is a story not being covered as much as usual compared to the events on the ground. when they go to this piece in "the washington post," each is saying that even if bashar al- assad is ousted, we will face a second syrian war. that is an affiliate of al qaeda called the islamic state of iraq and syria. the washington peace, the washington post is saying that his organization, the islamic state of iraq and syria, currently has 5000 fighters and 2000 recruits from northern syria. they are terrifying other groups in syria. the whole threat they pose is being outlined by the syrian army -- the free syrian army. qaeda at battled al over 24 locations around syria. we are still in the long haul with syria over this. >> we go to used in europe now, and you found a story in the "croatian times." folkis is about the rock legend b
that the u.n. commission of inquiry on syria's chemical weapons attack quote, points to the fact that evidence indicates responsibility at the highest level of government, including head of state. i know that the u.n. report did not say who was responsible. >> u.n. commissioner was talking about war crimes in general, specifically excluded the gas issue. because they had no information about it. they're not allowed, the u.n., presumably, to make a statement about who did what. they can say that there was a gas attack, but they don't want -- by commission, i guess, they're not allowed to say who did it. i don't know why. because i think there's a lot of evidence to be made available. there is sarin, it was used. the sarin that the syria army has has a different chemical component than the sarin that would be made by the front because the army is more sophisticated, has certain additives. certainly someone has looked at that. i don't know why they don't talk about the sarin they have and whether it shows it came from the army or did not. the other thing one could say is the preside
, they all say that iran should not have a nuclear weapon. and the u.n. it is the world coming together that is moving forward in this direction. and i think doing so in a wise manner, hopefully, they can change some of what has taken place in the region. but we have a long way to go and a lot of work to do. i don't want to give the impression that this is easy stuff. this is very tough stuff. i think secretary john kerry and president obama have been going at it in a slow but methodical manner, and we have to continue to grind it out. host: cnn reported on of the deals they set a particular point of contention is iran's assistance that the right under international agreement to enrich uranium the message to iran should be the should be that you are insisting on the right to enrich. you are. you do not do final negotiations and public. only knows that we have some preliminary to work on. what we did not want to happen mama and why this is important continue negotiating with iran or implemented nuclear programs and you could negotiate without this, but then there will be nothing to preve
the vatican refused a u.n. panel information about the church's investigation into sexual abuse of children by the clergy. is there still some secrecy behind what it is that they're discovering? >> reporter: well, the vatican today did respond to a similar question. they said that this u.n. panel wants to go back to 1990 and wants the details of every single instance of abuse by a member of the clergy worldwide, and the church said that they can't be held responsible for every member of the church around the world. but their attitude is, they're looking forward, as far as this commission goes, not going back into the past to deal with this issue. >> hopefully some comfort to those who were victim to all of that. ben, thanks so much. ben wedeman in rome. >> certainly hope to get some answers to those looking for more answers from the church. >>> back here in the united states, chances are you're either dealing with extreme heat or really wondering what this winter's all about. >> it's crazy. >> cold, wet, hot. atlanta is like -- >> it's 70 here in atlanta, redig lutz. >> love it. >> have a l
of inspection regimes and international sanctions and u.n. resolutions that were in place. we have been able to craft an international effort and verification mechanism around the iran nuclear program that is unprecedented and unique. that doesn't mean it's easy, and that's why we have to take it seriously. but i think one of the things that i have repeatedly said when people ask why should we try to negotiate with them, we can't trust them, we're being naive, what i try to describe to them is not the choice between this deal and the ideal, put the choice between this deal and other alternatives. if i had an option, if we could create an option in which iran eliminated every single nut and bolt of their nuclear program and foreswore the possibility of ever having a nuclear program and for that matter got rid of all its military capabilities, i would take it. but -- sorry, i want to make sure everybody understands, that particular option is not available, so as a consequence, what we have to do is make a decision given the options available, what's the best way to assure iran does not get a n
of state. that's not to mention if the 80 eminent people the ed of the eu or the u.n. logistically, very difficult. in terms of mandela, you know, what a man. i saw him many times. he had connections with gadhafi and castro. he really didn't care weather people were in favor in the western world or whether they were popular. he was very, very principled in the fact that if gadhafi, if the libyans or the cubans had given assistance to the anc in times of trouble, he felt loyal. he was very loyal to his friends. he would show the friendship back. what you are going to see is a mismatch of people. hemowho are celebrities, naomi campbell known for her temper and being a hot headed model sitting next to perhaps the head of iran. you know? there's a wonderful image when you can see about tomorrow. i think that is mandela as his p.a. said today, he's bringing people toothing in death as well as he did in life. >> we're looking at pictures of mandela dancing. he was somebody who celebrated life, as well, bringing so many people together. you just can't help but. >> i will and be inspired when yo
to study biology. >> he has the power, he says, like everyone else to reach for his dreams. >> the u.n. marked the 21st international day of persons with disabilities on thursday. >>> new numbers that show j.c. penneys' efforts to bounce back are working. >>> safety you can't see - new device offered to direct bicyclists in accidents. >>> looks can be deceiving, a picture of davonte freman, that isn't a photograph. welcome back. taking a look at business. aggressive discounts paying off for american automakers in november. sales climing to their highest levels in six years. chrysler raised by 6% because of the jeroke. ford up 7%. the fusion and f-series trucks leading the way. >>> j.c. penney's turn around plan is showing progress. sales rose for a second straight mondays, up 10% from a year ago. shoppers are turning to stores after the company brought back aggressive discounts that ron johnson, the previous ceo, had dropped. the do you closed lower on tuesday. falling 94 points. analysts say investors are worried about pulling back on the federal stimulus. we'll get a picture with a
. the u.n. is voting today on sending in international troops. and the king of thailand calls on the people to do their duty without directly referring to recent violent protests. those demonstrations are on hold today out of respect for the monarch's birthday. first
. u.n. secretary general hailed nelson mandela as a giant and a man of inspiration. he said he is profoundly saddened by his passing. >> nelson mandela was a giant for justice and a human inspiration. many around the world were greatly influenced by his self-less struggle for freedom. he touched our lives in deeply personal ways. at the same time, no one did more in our time to advance the values and aspirations of the united nations. >> let's go to the live desk now. pat lawson muse with reaction from former president bill clinton. pat? >> yes, former president clinton says he's lost a true friend today. also, he says, quote, history will remember nelson mandela as a champion of dignity and f freedom. we will remember him as a man of grace and compassion for whom abandoning bitterness and embracing adversaries. back to you. >> thanks so much. we'll have continuing coverage, of course, and reaction of his death throughout the night and online at www.nbcwashington.com. we'll also have a full hour long special edition of "nightly news" following our broadcast. >>> now to other ne
communication with mexican officials. now, officials at the international atomic energy agency, which is the u.n.'s nuclear watchdog group, are also involved in this investigation and they say there are more than 100 incidents of theft regarding radioactive materials reported to their agency every single year. bret. >> casey stegal, thank you. >>> the u.n. involved in another case saying there is growing evidence that syrian president bashir al assad and senior officials have been involved in war crimes and crimes against humanity. the complex dynamics in syria have the u.s. trying to talk peace with what is literally the lesser of two evils. good evening, katherine. >> reporter: the national security council staff and the intelligence agencies are referring all questions about the u.s. government's contacts with syria to the state department where today a spokesperson tries to play down direct talks as old news. >> we've been engaging with the broad section for a long time. it's been ongoing. of course we're incredibly concerned about the terrorist threat in syria. we've made that very clear. t
world braced for the world of mr. mandela's passing. world leaders from president obama to the u.n. secretary general, ban ki-moon, offered prayers and remembrances. but mr. mandela held on this summer. by the time of his 95th birthday on july 18th, with crowds gathered outside his hotel room to sing to him, to celebrate his life, mr. mandela was described by then as responding to treatment and his doctors said he was steadily improving. by august, mr. mandela was breathing normally. and although he was still battling the lung infection that had hospitalized him in the first place, in august, he was -- excuse me, on the first of september, he was discharged from the hospital, so that he can continue to receive intensive care at home, in johannesburg. after he died at his home today in johannesburg, his home there is where south africans have gathered tonight to pay their respects. joining us now is nbc news africa correspondent, rohit, thank you very much for being with us. what can you tell us just about the scene where you are and the reaction there? >> reporter: well, rachel, a
hostage? after the break, we're going to ask former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. and north korea troubleshooter bill richardson for his take. and you can't fight city hall, local officials tell one pint-size entrepreneur she can't sell mistletoe but she's welcome to, get this, beg. here's what she thought of that suggestion. >> the pins approximaterinciple need to start working hard. it's not applying themselves. >> and a hot story for all of you in the holiday season. a scarred childhood leads him to devote his life in helping children in need. you'll meet him later on in this show. life with crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis is a daily game of "what if's". what if my abdominal pain and cramps end our night before it even starts? what if i eat the wrong thing? what if? what if i suddenly have to go? what if? but what if the most important question is the one you're not asking? what if the underlying cause of your symptoms is damaging inflammation? for help getting the answers you need, talk to your doctor and visit crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patientadvoc
. a team of u.n. nuclear inspectors are visiting a heavy water production plant in iran that the country agreed to open to inspectors as part of the agreement that was made last month. all of this comes as president obama and iranian president hassan rouhani both defended that interim deal with iran that calls for the country to cap the amount of uranium enrichment in exchange for a bit of easing of the sanctions it was facing. president obama says the u.s. needs to see if the deal with iran will work out and gives it a 50/50 chance. critics say that is too big a risk. >> in the pacific, china said we want it, so now south korea is doing it, expanding its air defense zone. the country responding to recent actions by china that decided to suddenly expand their zone over those disputed islands in the east china sea. now the new development is sparking concerns over a possible broader project in the region. the zone would include two small islands along with a rock that's been submerged and is part of the dispute with beijing. >> this morning our thoughts and prayers are with billy graham a
, the president who has been speaking to the european commission president and the secretary general of the u.n., there is lots of international pressure here to try to stop further violence which was witnessed a week ago when the police heavy handedly moved in against the protesters causing injuries. there was an international outcry against that. that is right, that is the next crucial moment tuesday but i think the hope is some kind of compromise, some way through this can be found without further clashes between the protesters and the riot police. >> reporter: tim, thank you very much for getting us up to date and tim friend is from the capital kiev. you are watching the al jazeera news hour and still ahead severing family ties and kim jong-unhas been under the gun for drugs and gambling. and this is the streets of singapore and in sport find out why this shot from onon left tiger woods at the pga challenge in california, those details coming up. ♪ 27 people have been arrested in singapore after the worst riot in more than 40 years, two police vehicles were set a light after they hit and
1600 groups in the colony and u.n. improved an increase to 6,000. another attack in iraq as violence escalates and a car bomb exploded outside of a cafe in the northeast region killing 11 people and explosions on sunday killed 39 and injured more than 120. most of those attacks happened on busy commercial streets. u.n. says 8,000 iraqis have been killed this year. drone strikes and taliban were the topics today during high-level meetings in pakistan and chuck hagel met with sharif and the army chief and this is the first since the tirade that killed bin laden in 2011 and he flew and met with troops but not the president and hamid karzai is refusing to sign before the year's end. they are backing the afghan counterparts decision for the deal and karzai met in tehran sunday with rohani and calling for trade and security and they opposed the presence of troops in afghanistan, the only country asking karzai not to sign the security deal. the security agreement would secure billions of dollars afghanistan needs to boost economy but in limbo the currency is falling and as al jazeera jayne
.s. military is the strongest in the world. u.s. and n.a.t.o. leaders are meeting in bruls -- brussels hoping to percade hamid karzai to sign. keeping u.s. military troops past 2014. after a second day of talks, paul joins us. >> n.a.t.o. officials meet with afghan's foreign minister. could we be closer to a signature. >> i think the principal you have to think of when you talk about these meetings, is like an apple press. you tighten the pressure in the hope that the juice flows. there's a blockage in the pipeline. it is hamid karzai. he's not willing to sign the bilateral agreement. even john kerry will not speculate as to why he will not sign it. hamid karzai at the moment says no. susan rice went to kabul, he said no. as john kerry says on tuesday here in brussels, there are some 50 nations who are part of the effort to stablilize afghanistan. they have budgetary cycles, planning cycles, and you don't turn off military cycles like this. there has to be planning involved. n.a.t.o. says it needs the signature before the end of the year. n.a.t.o. officials said any signature will do. hamid k
under nelson mandela in the first democratic cabinet. as u.n. ambassador and foreign minister, it was his task to publicly defend the yisent of nelson mandela and other political opponents. privately he maintains he lobbied for nelson mandela's release. >> in 1982 i submitted a memorandum prepared by my department. and to the effect that nelson mandela ought to be released. we were making a bigger martyr of you every day stays in prison. that is international. and status. would be growing to an extent where he would not be able to handle it. eight years later nelson mandela became a free man. here you had a man who spent 27 years in prison and the day he was released. he displayed the - he displayed the cuban and energy to the person. who has been a president before. amazing what this idea, in the minds of people and for that matter, into world affairs. >> and central to the success of the process, that led to a peaceful transfer of power, was nelson mandela's insistence that there need be no losers, that all could win. >> we were not capitulating. you do not capitulate and
madeleine albright, former secretary of state and u.s. ambassador to the u.n. dr. albright. [applause] >> sandy berger former national security advisor to president clinton. sandy. [applause] >> leon fuerth, former national security advisor to vice president gore. [applause] >> nancy soderberg, former deputy national security advisor to president clinton. [applause] >> and general wesley clark, former supreme allied commander europe and director of strategic plans and policy for the joint chiefs of staff. general clark. [applause] >> i would also like to recognize the director of the clinton library. thank you. [applause] >> joseph, the director of the cia information management services. [applause] >> skip rutherford, the dean of the clinton school of public service. [applause] >> bruce lindsey, the chairman of the board of the clinton foundation. [applause] >> forward slash future of transportation rodney slater. [applause] >> and governor jim guy tucker. [applause] >> it is now my pleasure to introduce dr. john gannon. dr. gannon served as the deputy director for intelligence at th
and supported the capacity of the civilian side, both the government and the u.n. to set up land and sea bridges to help clear the roads so that we were able to wrap up the military engagement and bring forward the longer term civilian ability to ensure that the delivery were able to continue. lo jiggics were the number one focus. followed by three key priorities. emergency shelter, water sanitation, and food. there were about a million homes destroyed by the storm. we air lifted right away heavy duty plastic sheeting to the philippines that -- contribute temporary shelters. the water supply were ranched. the system were down. we focused on provision of clean water, chlorine tablet, and very quickly worked to get it up and running with the support to unreceive and by the time i was there. that was already providing 100% the water for the municipal area. the philippines government and the international community continued to -- spornd to the health concerns. there are nearly 200 health teams on the ground now and more than 2,000 children have been immunized. and withstanding water trapped in the
the tributes after ban ki-moon, the u.n. secretary general speaks, the tribute by foreign dignitaries, then the president of the united states, barack obama, followed by the leaders of brazil, china and india and then cuba. raul castro. they will all be on this little stage, this little area in front of 90,000 people who have gathered in the soccer stadium so there could be a moment where president obama and raul castro may shake hands, may talk, who knows. >> be interesting to watch if they shake hands. that was the big thing, the gore people wanted no physical contact or substantive communications because of the relationship between the two countries. obviously, you can get as close as we are at an event like that and we will see what happens. you watch something like that. for the former presidents to be together, you know this because you have been at big events, the opening of presidential libraries here at home, the king hussain funeral, you had a group like that. the pope john paul ii funeral, you had several presidents together. it's a security challenge, number one, then the
who is the u.n. special repertoire on counterterrorism announced they're going to look at the whole information gathering by the u.s. and the uk. he's going to summarize it. he said it's the role of the free press to hold the government to account and some of the questions from the -- that regarded the investigation and he was on the front of the tabloid newspapers joining that. are you welcoming the u.n. investigation into this issue about -- the whole issue of gathering all of this information and the extent of it? >> absolutely. we had a long and tortured debate about levinson. and during that debate, we heard repeated assurances from all three party leaders that the -- that the politicians would not interfere in the press. and it seems to me at the very first hurdle, parliament is in danger of falling in that. as i say, i could earlier the -- the general counsel of the nsa, so this is not else inially a friend of all journalists, he's a full-time guy saying, of course, we didn't want this stuff in the public domain. and i perfectly understood why intelligence agencies want to ke
the national institute of health, michelle from u.n. aids, debra carrying on the great work of our acting global aids coordinator and our many friends from the philanthropic world including bill gates. thank you for joining us here today. now, every year this is a moment to reflect on how far we've come since the early days of the aids epidemic. those of you who lived through it remember all too well the fear and stigma and how hard people with hiv had to fight to be seen or heard or treated with basic compassion. do you remember how little we knew about how to prevent aids or treat them. what we did know was the devastation it inflicted, striking down vibrant men and women in the prime of their lives and spreading from city to city and country to country seemingly overnight. today that picture is transformed. thanks to the courage and love of so many of you in this room and around the world, awareness has soared, research has surged, prevention, treatment and care are now saving millions of lives not only in the world's richest countries but in some of the world's poorest countries as we
they give no credibility to this report whatsoever. they said, quote, pela who is the u.n. human rights chief has talked to, quote, nonsense in the past and they are sort of trying to brush this off but it is something will carry a lot of weight internationally. the united states nations head of human rights wants to take syria to the international criminal court and that would be something that would up the ante considerably, zoraida. >> thank you very much. frederik pleitgen reporting live for us in damascus. >>> allen gross was in prison four years ago in cuba. now in a new letter he appeals for president obama to personally intervene in his case saying extraordinary steps have been taken for other americans. the letter will be delivered today. part of a new strategy by his family to put direct pressure on the white house. a copy was given to "the washington post." >>> major snowstorm is set to hit part of the country! >> i know. it doesn't feel that like here. it's warm here. >> it is. indra petersons is covering that for us. >> i want to give you a jump-start. >> this is bad news?
2011. a u.n. fact finding team has found what it calls massive evidence that the highest levels of the syrian government are responsible for war crimes, and crimes against humanity. >> the u.n. report also blames the rebels for committing war crimes. and they point to the fact that the majority of syrian victims have been killed and wounded by conventional weapons and not chemical ones. >> to finds out how you can help those affected by this civil war, check out cnn.com/impact your world. >> let's turn to russia now where moscow's bolshoi ballet has long represented grace and culture but a horrific attack happened that sounds more like a tragic play and the drama that's played out more like an opera than ballet. a dancer and two others charged with throwing acid in the face of the bolshoi's artistic director. sergei filin. now as atika schubert reports those attackers just found out how much time they're going to serve. >> this is the home of the world famous bowl shoil ballet company and the scene for numerous allegations of corruption and scandal that will unfolded over the co
seem like the administration has given up something they shouldn't be gig up. >> this violates the u.n. security council resolutions, the u.n. proliferation treating and empowers other countries in the northeast to say we're going to strike an accord to allow you to continue your uranium enrichment and it encourages other countries to say we've abided by this and if you allow iran to do this, why can't we do this? >> we didn't stop pakistan. we didn't stop north korea. the idea that iran can be stopped if they want to make a nuclear weapon seems to not have a great historic precedent. >> they have the know-how. they're always going to have the know-how. what would it take if they make the decision that they're going to pursue the bomb? it would take a sustained military campaign. not just a bombing campaign because a bombing campaign would set them back for a period of time, but if they were determined, it would have to be repeated bombing campaign and it may involve boots on the ground. because that is often an awful prospect, we need to try everything, in my view, to see if that he i
who is the u.n. special repertoire on counterterrorism going to look re at the whole information u.s. and the he uk. he's going to summarize it. he said it's the role of the to hold the government to account and some of the questions from the torym.p. that regarded the investigation and he was on the newspapers tabloid joining that. are you welcoming the u.n. into this issue issue of he whole gathering all of this information and the extent of it? >> absolutely. and tortured debate about levinson. and during that debate, we heard from all ssurances three party leaders that the -- hat the politicians would not interfere in the press. me at the very in t hurdle, parliament is danger of falling in that. earlier the --ld the general counsel of the nsa, else inially a friend of all journalists, he's saying, of guy course, we didn't want this stuff in the public domain. perfectly understood why intelligence agencies want to keep all of this stuff secret. it is in the public, once it is in the hands of the says, the nsa guy press must be protected. wonderful thing about america and i th
of the white house and this one, worn by students in south korea. the u.n. saying aids-related deaths dropping by 30% from last year from 2005. >>> well, a flashback to the '80s tonight. remember trying to solve those rubik's cubes? it's back. an artist turning this office building into a giant glowing cube. it challenges even the pros. trying to crack the code with a hand-held remote control. turning the city skyline into a giant video game. >>> and how about the tv viewers who tuned in for the news and did a bit of a double take in north dakota this weekend? stunned by the fill-in anchor man. the one and only ron burgundy. there's that three-piece suit and will ferrell at the anchor next, next to amber schatz, who struggled to keep her composure at times, but burgundy was in his element. >> you look lovely tonight. >> thank you. >> are you married? >> no. >> well, i am. so don't get any ideas. >> somebody didn't tell him it's not the '70s anymore. burgundy anchored the entire show. of course, the new movie "anchorman 2," out right before christmas. >>> when we come back here tonight, what ha
implicated the syrian president and more than 100,000 people have been killed in the conflict. the u.n. says afghanistan is the world east most dangerous place for relief worker and said attacks on aid workers fripelled there and 36 have been killed and 46 injured and u.n. are not saying blame for attacks but taliban has taken responsible for many of them. activists including one american boerted boats in the gaza strip with restrictions on waterways in the mediterranean sea. israeli government said imports are monitored to prevent dangerous materials from entering occupied territory and the six mile restrictions hurt the economy and al jazeera's nick has more from jerusalem. >> six years israel controlled the seas and today activists wanted to take them back and living in gaza cannot go six miles from the coast and war ships block everything going in and going out and they say that strangled the economy and so they challenge the blockade and going straight for israeli ships and aware of the risk and they arrested and they attacked for sailing more than six miles out. >> we are armed with in
and also incorporating will be called cash for work as a part of our program working with our u.n. and ngo partners who have a lot of skill addicts. doing programs that basically provide a decent wage in return for clearing debris away. this would be a huge challenge, an important challenge. unfortunately or fortunately, the philippines have a fair amount of experience in dealing with debris. it is a scale issue in this sense and will be an area of the media focus has been lookahead. you've raised some of the other associated concerns about disease with debris and for that reason, the fogginess a very important approach because there's standing water. the other issue of coors is there still pulling bodies out from underneath these mountains of debris and that will likely remain an ongoing effort as they work their way through the recovery. i'm trafficking, this has been an area of concern in the philippines for some time. in fact, the united states has put about $11 million into counter trafficking programming in the philippines. we work closely with them and called the philippines interag
violence honestly since two thousand and nine the u n s to ninety nine pence and being killed since the start of the key we have an online project which has wanted to iraq's ongoing funding to confine that help calm. hundreds of indigenous brazilian people have attempted to storm government buildings in the capital itself to the justice ministry grade and new rooms for the chemo patient making plans for next year's world cup. security guards at the presidential race heats at the sprite in protest as he pushed at distract the national costume contest on the ministry of justice saying the grill was to undermine the rights to an ancestral lands. so it was on the right call. next its mx and slicing my concert i live to noon. i am. we often see the middle east is a place that's a term of revolution people call it seemed to be very fired up as well. masses of protesters to force a government ministries to shut down by storming the look you in waves. one such ministry is the kind of cool that of the american fbi which has been accused of killing around ninety people in a crackdown on thos
at the u.n. in geneva. we fought hard for that. but think of the new markets that would open up and the bridges between people that peace would build him a think of the flood of foreign investment and business opportunities that would come to israel and how that would change the lives of everyday people throughout the region. fischer, the former governor of the bank of israel said, a peace agreement with the palestinians could boost israel's gdp in a short period of time by as much as 6%. israel would also enjoy a normal peaceful relationship the moment this agreement is signed with 22 arab nations and 35 muslim all.ns -- 57 countries in it is not beyond our imagination to envision that a new order could be established in the middle east, in which countries like jordan, morocco, a newly independent palestine and an internationally recognized jewish state of israel joined together to promote stability and peace. new from the start that if his young state were to do more than just survive, if israel were to succeed, it would need more than just strong defenses. he said israel woul
of the sanctions. >> this comes as we learn a team of u.n. inspectors have begun their odded of an iranian water production plant that is connected to the nuclear program. we have more on that examination. finally, conner, we get a closer look. >> jamie, for the first time in more than two years, international inspectors are in iran, and they're at the heavy water plant. the inspection of this nuclear facility is seen as the first test of this new international deal between the world and iran. now, of course, under this temporary agreement, the islamic republican has agreed to halt some of its nuclear activities in the next six months for exchange for sanctions relief. they said the program is for peaceful purposes. few people around the world believe those claims. president obama defended this yesterday in the forum on international affairs. he said the bottom line is to prevent iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. the sanction relief will depend on iran's actions going forward. >> if and when iran shows itself not to be abiding by the agreement, not to be negotiated in good faith, we can reve
with realities that we had before us. >> margaret brennan with secretary of defense hagel today. u.n. weapons inspector as roifed this morning in a heavy water production plant near the eye rather thannian capitol of tehran. it is one of the sites iran agreed to open up as part of last week's nuclear agreement. elizabeth palm certificate in tehran tonight. liz, what do we know about what happened? >> good evening, jeff, well, we're past the first hurdle. iran had promised to let the inspectors into this site which is associated with a very controversial reactor which could, when it's working, produce plutonium. they said the inspector kos go in, two of them want in today. and there are talks of their next going to be allowed to inspect iran's uranium mines which is something the international community would very much like to have a good close look at. >> liz what is the reaction to all of this inside iran? >> the majority of people see this deal as welcome relief from sanctions. but the hard-liners are very much against it. in fact, president rouhani has been accused by the hard-liners of se
was toppled over. people taking turns taking aim. >>> and from iran tonight, state tv is reporting that u.n. inspectors have begun their work. it comes after that landmark short-term nuclear agreement. this weekend in washington, meantime, president obama giving the odds of achieving a long-term agreement with iran 50/50 at best. >>> meantime, the pentagon under fire tonight for its decision to buy combat helicopters made in russia. lawmakers on both sides, asking, why not made in america? here tonight, abc's aditi roy. >> reporter: tonight, new questions arise as to why the pentagon chose to spend more than $1 billion on dozens of russian mi-17 helicopters, to support afghan troops, bypassing u.s. manufacturers. the defense department signed the deal more than two years ago and pentagon officials defended the move, citing a 2010 top secret study, which they said recommended the russian helicopter as the top choice. but the associated press has obtained excerpts of the study, which said the u.s. manufactured chinook helicopter was the, quote, most cost effective single platform type fleet f
, and they assured him the deal would get done. >>> in iran, u.n. nuclear inspectors visited a heavy water production plant on sunday. this is the first time in more than two years inspectors have been allowed inside. two weeks ago iran agreed to curb its nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions. >>> and coming up on the "morning news," fan frenzy. a riot breaks out in the stands at a soccer match, sending some people to the hospital. this is the "cbs morning news." to the hospital. this is the "cbs morning news." if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about trying or adding a biologic. this is humira, adalimumab. this is humira working to help relieve my pain. this is humira helping me through the twists and turns. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further damage. doctors have been prescribing humira for over ten years. humira works by targeting and helping to block a specific source of inflammation that contributes to ra symptoms. for many adults, humira is proven to help relieve pain and stop further joint damage. humira can lower your
the weekend u.n. inspectors arrived to begin inspections on a nuclear facility there. president obama called it a critical first step before adding that the negotiations will in no way weaken the position of the united states. >> if at the end of six months it turns out that we can't make a deal, we're no worse off and, in fact, we have greater leverage with the international community to continue to apply sanctions and even strengthen them. if you ask me what is the likelihood that we're able to arrive at the end state i was just describing earlier, i wouldn't say that it's more than 50/50. but we have to try. >> defense secretary chuck hagel has touched down in pakistan today. the first time in three years a pentagon chief has visited that country. hagel met with their prime minister to discuss tensions over drone strikes and military operations near the border with afghanistan. he spent the weekend in afghanistan visiting u.s. troops. he did not meet with afghan president hamid karzai who is refusing to sign a security agreement with the united states before the end of the year. secretary
killed. gun battles in the central african republic as the u.n. talks about reinforcing foreign troops there. >> now claims the u.s. spy agency is collecting 5 billion phone records every day t
of stagnation. >> the u.n. is marking today as international day for persons with disabilities. saying more than 1 billion people, 15% of the world's population live with a disability. the government estimates 19% of people have one, and many are children. some schools use technology to help kids learn, even if they can't see, hear or speak. roxana saberi visited one of those schools that specialises in eted u kating kids with severe disabilities. >> kids come to the henry viscardi school from all over new york. some, like chris, in an ambulance. the 16-year-old has a disability and he requires constant medical care. now he's on his way to earning a high school diploma. >> since i came here they taught me a lot, that there are no limits, and i can do anything. >> this confidence is in large part thanks to technology like this. >> do you remember how to do that? >> no. >> it's helping 180 students with severe disabilities who might otherwise not be able to study. >> i know what i want. i don't let anyone stop me. >> 20-year-old chelsea can't speak through her mouth, but this helps her to communt
from the national institute of health, and michelle from u.n. aids, and debra who is carrying on the great work as the acting global aids coordinator and many friends from the philanthropic world including bill gates, so, thank you, all, for joining us here today. every year, this is a moment to reflect on how far we've come since early days of the aids end epidemic, and those of you who lived through it remember all too well the fear and the stigma and how hard people with hiv had to fight to be heard or be treated with decent compassion. you remember how little we knew how to prevent aids or how it treat it. what we knew is the devastation inflected, striking down vibrant men and women in the time of their lives spreading to city to city, country to country seemingly overnight. today, that picture has transformed thanks to the courage and love of some of you in this room and around the world awareness soars, research surged, prevention, treatment, and care save millions of lives in the richest countries and the world's poorest countries as well. for many, with testing and ac
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